Righteous indignation

THE action of the Lord in cleansing the temple is often quoted as an example of righteous indignation. Yet in all the four records (Matthew 21, Mark 11, Luke 19, John 2) it is nowhere stated that the Lord was angry. Certainly it was not righteous indignation which drove back those soldiers, ordered to arrest him (John 7:46); nor was it righteous indignation which made armed men retreat and fall to the ground in Gethsemane (John 18:6). Was not the same power at work in the temple incident? But even if we concede that the Lord might have been expressing righteous indignation, what right have we unrighteous ones to claim that we can also show righteous indignation? It is more likely that we are confusing righteous indignation with wrathful feelings of revenge, personal provocation, and wounded pride. Certainly the Lord never lost his temper. Every word and action was under complete control.

NORMAN BILTON, The Christadelphian, 1977, page 218.