John – shut up in prison

FROM a certain point of view, it is saddening to think of such a man as John the Baptist in the hands of such creatures as Herod and his paramour, and sadder to think that his life should be sacrificed to the feminine malice created by John’s upright attitude as a preacher of righteousness. But the sadness is only for a moment. It is the lot of divine things and divine men to be under the heel of wickedness in the day of sin’s ascendancy. We can comfort ourselves with the thought that they do not come under the heel by chance, or before the appointed time. It is part of the process by which they are prepared for, and ultimately introduced to “an eternal weight of glory”. And there is the further consolation that to the victims of the oppression, the triumph of the enemy is “but for a moment”. Death is the best thing that can happen to them. Their trials and distresses are annihilated at a stroke: and in a moment, they are face to face with the glory for which their distresses prepare them, for the simple reason that in death there is no knowledge of time, and therefore no conscious interval to the resurrection.

ROBERT ROBERTS, Nazareth Revisited, pages 25,26.